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5 Reasons to Try CBD Tea and 5 Best CBD Teas to Try

Tea is a wonderful thing. It can be served cold or hot and is sometimes packed with a little bit of caffeine in addition to lovely antioxidants. Additionally, it comes in countless delicious flavors (if you happen to be someone who doesn’t like tea, we can agree to disagree on that). There’s also a rich place in cultures ranging from Europe to the Middle East to Asia and beyond. (Per person, Turkey is by far the largest consumer of tea, FYI, with England coming in third, right after the Emerald Isle right off its west coast.) What could possibly make this perennially prized beverage better, you ask? A few milligrams of cannabidiol, as it turns out, better known as CBD.

You probably know the basics about tea already (herbal, green, black, good with lemon, good with milk and sugar, kind of led to the Opium Wars, and so on) so let’s cover the basics on CBD.

Though derived from the marijuana plant, CBD won’t get you high. As Keith Dolo, CEO of cannabis extract producer Sproutly, explains it: “CBD and THC are two of many compounds that are derived from the marijuana plant. Unlike THC, CBD does not have psychoactive properties and does not produce a high or intoxication.”

So what’s the effect of CBD on a human being? Dolo stated that CBD is “being studied for therapeutic uses.” Hilal Tabsh, the vice president of marketing from Aceso, another leading cannabidiol product producer, expanded on the concept, saying: “Hemp contains naturally occurring phytocannabinoids, which when consumed, interact with the body’s endocannabinoid system. This central regulatory system is known to affect bodily processes such as appetite, mood, and sleep.”

Why do tea and CBD make such a great pair? While CBD won’t get you high, it may get you tired. The caffeine in the tea can help balance the slight sedative effects of the cannabidiol, letting you enjoy the full benefits of its potential stress and anxiety reduction and focus enhancement without making you feel sluggish.

If all that sounds good to you, then here are five CBD teas to sip on your tea time this winter. You may also want to check out other CBD drinks and the best CBD gummies.

Buddha Teas CBD Turmeric and Ginger Tea

While not the tastiest tea on the list, this stuff brews into a beverage that’s like a flying side-kick of healthiness. Not that getting kicked is good for you. Turmeric has been used in traditional medicines for thousands of years, and while that means nothing in terms of actual efficacy, modern medicine has actually proved the benefits of the curcumin it contains, which can reduce the chances of heart disease and cancer. Also, there are 5 milligrams of CBD in there. Drink a cup daily, and you may add some time to your life story.

The Brothers Apothecary CBD Infused Tea

This Portland-based CBD tea purveyor offers eight different blends of tea, from Chai Awakening to Highbiscus (see what they did there?) to Mellow Mint. What all the variations have in common is a sizable 52.8 mg of CBD per serving.

Green Roads Chamomile CBD Tea

If you’re looking for a perfect CBD tea blend for relaxing in the evening, then Green Roads Chamomile CBD Tea should be on your list. Caffeine free and soothing in taste, this tea has a moderate seven milligrams of CBD made from hemp grown in the United States. It comes in bags that brew into a perfect before-bed cup in about five to seven minutes.

Glow Water CBD Tea

Glow Water offers three different CBD teas, each of which was formulated with a different user experience in mind. There’s the Sleep CBD Tea, and you can guess what that’s about. The company also makes a Calm CBD Tea, and ditto there, we’ll wager. Finally, Glow Water offers Restore CBD Tea, and that one was blended to help reduce aches and soreness and to help your body repair itself on the cellular level after a workout or other strenuous physical activity.

One Love Tea CBD Tea

An offshoot of established tea brand One Love Tea, the on-the-nose-named CBD Tea offers myriad loose-leaf CBD teas, both with and without caffeine; CBD Match Green Tea Powder; CBD Turmeric Golden Milk Powder; and multiple tea-related products. The company’s blends include several flavors not to be missed, including Apple Pie Green Tea and Mango Magic Honeybush.

More of a coffee person? Check out our roundup of CBD coffees.

Looking for a new type of tea for your daily cup? We've rounded up here some great CBD tea brands — they're as relaxing as they are tasty.

I Tried CBD in My Tea, and Here’s What I Felt

Curious about CBD? Here are some first-time tips.

I’ve been burned by a lot of wellness fads in the past. Indeed, it’s been my job for over a decade to embrace what companies say will be the new “revolution” in health and personal care and make myself a guinea pig. I’ve tried any number of products, diets, even retreats to determine if they have hope (probiotics) or belong at the bottom of the bin (rocker bottom shoes).

So naturally, with the rapid proliferation of CBD shops across the U.S., my nature brought me to the point at which I had to try this much-hyped and ballyhooed product—and write about it so you’ll know if it’s right for you or not.

What Is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of several dozen active compounds found in cannabis. CBD’s popular first cousin, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is the compound that’s associated with marijuana’s “high” or psychoactive effects. CBD has zero psychoactive effects.

Research shows that CBD has some positive benefits on health, however. For example, studies show CBD may help relieve pain and reduce inflammation. It’s also been shown to help treat or prevent seizures in people with epilepsy. CBD has shown promise as a treatment for common side effects of cancer treatment, including nausea and vomiting. It even holds promise as a treatment for anxiety, and it might help with short-term sleep problems, too.

So CBD Isn’t Marijuana?

No, it’s not. Some people confuse hemp with marijuana because they’re both types of cannabis. Indeed, both hemp and marijuana are different varieties of the same plant species, Cannabis sativa. But marijuana typically has between three and 15 percent THC, and hemp has less than one percent. CBD products, by law, cannot have more than 0.3% THC by dry weight.

In December 2018, the U.S. Congress removed hemp from the Controlled Substances Act. It is no longer illegal to possess hemp-derived products in all 50 states. That’s why you’ve likely seen so many stores popping up in your town, or even found your local spa or health food store selling CBD products. Indeed, a recent report found that the popularity and accelerated growth in the market has CBD on track to be a $2-billion dollar industry by 2024.

I Tried CBD in My Tea

There’s a stigma, for better or worse, associated with marijuana that may be deterring people from trying CBD. I will be the first one to tell you that, as a rule, I’m no fan of the sensation of being “high” or stoned. I do, however, like and am always curious about, alternative treatments to health issues I face, whether it’s essential oils for headaches, acupuncture for low-back pain, or probiotics for regular tummy troubles. Because research shows CBD may help ease symptoms of anxiety, I decided it was a good option for me to try.

I started by using half a dropper of a 500-milligram tincture in a cup of green tea in the morning and a cup of herbal tea before bed. I did this every day for one week. Each half dropper delivers about 8 milligrams of CBD; a full dropper would be 16. Typical recommended doses for people trying CBD for the first time are between 20 and 40mg per day. However, research shows much higher doses are well tolerated.

My first experience with CBD was at night, after a long day of work. I was exhausted but decided to go ahead and give it a try. Many brands recommend you take CBD oil sublingually, or under the tongue, for a faster-acting effect. I chose tea in order to mask the bitter oil flavor of the tincture.

I don’t know if I can fully credit the CBD—I was very tired already—but I found myself quite relaxed within 15 minutes of finishing my cup of tea. I was asleep shortly after, and I had very deep sleep that night. My sleep tracker recorded 100 percent sleep quality, with very little movement. That’s unusual for me, but again, it was a long, taxing day. My body could have been responding to the exhaustion, not the CBD. But I was certainly curious.

The next morning, I repeated the amount and felt nothing, not even a hint of relaxation. That’s OK. I’m typically more relaxed and refreshed in the morning as is, so it could be that I didn’t have any “symptoms” to alleviate.

Over the course of the next four days, I only noticed mild effects when I would take the CBD with my tea before bed. During the day, I felt nothing. I decided to up my dosage to a full stopper for the three remaining days. That’s when I began to notice some differences.

My first day with two full droppers (32mg), I felt incredibly relaxed, almost too relaxed. I struggled a bit to find motivation for work. Thankfully, it was a Saturday, so I could afford the luxury of laziness. I didn’t experience any “head” symptoms, like dopiness or feeling spaced out, as some people with higher doses report. But I did certainly feel a bit disconnected from my sense of drive. That night, when I used another whole dropper in my tea, I fell to sleep rapidly and slept harder than I had slept in some time.

The next day, the effects of my first higher-dose day weren’t as strong. I was able to accomplish my work and felt productive, but a certain “edge” was taken off my mind. When I work, I typically feel crunched or pinched by deadlines, even when I’m on not late. The higher CBD didn’t fully erase the “urgency” I feel with my work, but it helped me feel calmer, less frantic.

For that, my week with CBD counts as a win, and I will likely keep taking it, especially during periods of high stress or anxiety. I may also venture to try other options, like gummies. Other brands have different formulations that may make the effects of CBD more or less powerful, too. Though my total dose, even on the “high” dose days, was well within the recommended limits for a first-time user, I would be curious to see the impact of a higher dose. I’ll just be sure to do it on days when I don’t have deadlines.

Overall Takeaway

My initial impression is a positive one. I fully believe people can have positive results after taking CBD for a variety of issues. In my experiment, I was only trying to treat anxiety, and I found it to be moderately helpful. It did not eliminate the anxiety or associated stress, but it felt as if it took the sharp edge off the running worries and constant stream of thoughts that I frequently experience. I felt calmer, though not at all “high.”

It’s important to note that CBD use and products are still in their infancy, and newer, better products will probably be available in the next few years that will make these initial products look silly. Indeed, some studies suggest CBD is really, truly only beneficial in large doses (over 300 milligrams), so it’s possible the impacts people like myself do experience are minimal compared to what’s possible. As studies increase and products improve, the CBD landscape may change dramatically.

If you are interested in trying CBD yourself, be sure to source high-quality CBD products. Unfortunately, CBD products have been dropping in quality in recent years, and they are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). That means you cannot know for sure, just by looking at a bottle, if you have a good product. Look for third-party lab tests—reputable companies will proudly promote them—and read a lot of reviews. Websites like Leafly and CannaInsider provide extensive reviews on effectiveness and potency.

Curious about CBD? Here are some first-time tips.