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Is CBD oil legal in Washington?

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Contents

  1. What is CBD?
  2. Why is CBD sometimes illegal?
  3. Washington CBD laws
  4. Where to buy CBD in Washington
  5. How to read CBD labels and packaging

CBD oil is currently under scrutiny and subject to strict regulation in Washington. The state recently banned the use of hemp-derived CBD in food and beverage products following current guidelines from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. As of October 2019, CBD cannot be used as an ingredient in foods or beverages, under federal and state law. CBD oil which contains more than 0.3% THC must be sold in licensed cannabis dispensaries.

Washington was one of the first states in the country to legalize cannabis. Medical marijuana has been legal in Washington since 1998. Adult-use marijuana was legalized in 2012 with the passing of Initiative 502, also known as the Washington Marijuana Legalization and Regulation Initiative.

What is CBD?

CBD is the second-most prominent cannabinoid found in cannabis following THC. Unlike THC, which produces a high, CBD is non-intoxicating. CBD also contains a host of potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-anxiety, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and seizure suppressing properties.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Why is CBD sometimes illegal?

All types of cannabis, including hemp strains that don’t produce enough THC to cause intoxication, were considered illegal under the Federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970. The law categorized all cannabis as Schedule 1, which defined the plant as a highly addictive substance with a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use.

The 2018 Farm Bill re-classified hemp as an agricultural commodity, and made its cultivation federally legal. Further, the act removed some forms of cannabis from Schedule 1 status by creating a legal distinction between hemp and marijuana. Hemp is cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, and marijuana refers to cannabis with more than 0.3% THC. This distinction in federal law effectively legalized CBD that is derived from cannabis with less than 0.3% THC, as long as it’s been cultivated according to federal and state regulations.

The 2018 Farm Bill legislation does not mean that CBD derived from hemp is universally legal throughout the United States. According to the Farm Bill, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the power to regulate CBD product labeling, including therapeutic claims and the use of CBD as a food additive. The FDA has already maintained that even hemp-derived CBD may not legally be added to food and beverages, or marketed as a dietary supplement. Although the organization has begun to re-evaluate some of these stances on legal CBD products, the FDA has not revised its regulations. The agency also has been strict in its stance against any labeling that could be perceived as a medical claim about CBD.

In addition to federal regulation of CBD, the Farm Bill also gave states the option to regulate and prohibit the cultivation and commerce of CBD. States may also regulate CBD in food, beverages, dietary supplements, and cosmetic products independently, even before the FDA finalizes its policies. Washington is an example of a state that has devised its own regulatory framework for CBD.

Washington CBD laws

With the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, an influx of CBD-infused products hit the Washington market. In October 2019, Washington banned the sale of hemp-derived CBD in food and beverage products in line with current policies from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

While the ban is recent, and the state hasn’t made any attempts to penalize or prosecute retailers or CBD brands, representatives of the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) are actively working to remove these products from shelves. The WSDA recently released a statement outlining their stance on CBD in food and as a medicine.

Although food containing CBD is not permitted to be created or sold in Washington, WSDA-licensed food processors can use other hemp products in foods. These foods include hulled hemp seeds, hemp seed protein powder, and hemp seed oil, provided they comply with all other requirements. Topical products containing CBD are also still available for purchase from retailers.

CBD oil containing more than 0.3% THC is available, but can only be sold and purchased in licensed cannabis dispensaries. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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CBD oil containing more than 0.3% THC is available, but can only be sold and purchased in licensed cannabis dispensaries. Consumable CBD products can now only be sold only in licensed retail marijuana dispensaries.

Licensing requirements for CBD

Currently, anyone intending to grow, process, or market industrial hemp must apply for a license through the Industrial Hemp Research Pilot program (IHRP). The program recently combined the separate application forms into one universal application to simplify the process and reduce the amount of supporting documentation necessary to apply for a license.

In the wake of the 2018 Farm Bill, the Department of Agriculture issued a new policy statement on the transition from the IHRP to the implementation of a commercial hemp program that conforms to federal rules and revised state laws. The most notable changes to the updated hemp program include:

  • Licensed growers are solely responsible for procuring hemp seed and must notify the IHRP of the source of the seed.
  • Licensed growers are no longer required to maintain the four-mile minimum buffer distance from a licensed marijuana grower.
  • IHRP grower license requirements have been simplified to align with new hemp plan requirements.

When the new hemp program is adopted, those already licensed to grow hemp under the IHRP may transfer.

All industrial hemp must contain less than 0.3% THC when tested. According to the WSDA, any industrial hemp field, greenhouse or harvest that tests over 0.3% no longer meets the definition of industrial hemp under the law. The IHRP is currently considering the most appropriate enforcement actions.

Washington CBD possession limits

Consumers are allowed to purchase or possess up to one ounce of marijuana, 16 ounces of marijuana-infused CBD edibles in solid form, and 72 ounces of marijuana-derived CBD liquids.

Consumers are allowed to purchase or possess up to 72 ounces of marijuana-derived CBD liquids. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Possession above the legal limits is a criminal offense. There is no penalty articulated specifically for those with excess quantities of marijuana-derived CBD edibles or liquids. However, possession of one ounce to forty grams of cannabis is treated as a misdemeanor. Those charged will receive a prison sentence of up to 90 days and a maximum fine of $1000.

The possession of more than forty grams of cannabis is treated as a felony, resulting in a minimum of 5 years imprisonment and a maximum fine of $10,000.

Where to buy CBD in Washington

Currently, CBD is banned in the use of dietary supplements, food, and beverage products in the state of Washington. At present, the WSDA is not performing raids, so many of these products remain on the shelves at retailers, such as grocery stores and coffee shops.

The ban does not affect CBD products sold at licensed dispensaries, where shoppers can find and purchase products containing CBD, including CBD oil and edibles. There are benefits to buying CBD oil and other CBD products directly from a licensed retailer, such as immediate access to a product and the knowledge that it conforms to legal requirements.

Consumers can shop from a wide variety of online outlets for CBD products, read consumer reviews, and ship purchases to their homes. Online shopping also offers the ability to gather detailed information about each product, compare different products and product types, and comparison shop to find the best price. CBD brands also often have their own e-commerce shop, allowing you to purchase your desired CBD products straight from the source. Products purchased online, however, are unlikely to be in line with Washington state legal requirements.

How to read CBD labels and packaging

The 2018 Farm Bill shifted oversight of CBD from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At present, there are no clear regulations regarding CBD labels and packaging.

Although the regulations are in flux, companies selling CBD must still make legitimate claims on their labels. Reputable CBD producers will typically include the following information on their CBD product labels.

  • Amount of active CBD per serving.
  • Supplement Fact panel, including other ingredients.
  • Net weight.
  • Manufacturer or distributor name.
  • Suggested use.
  • Full spectrum, broad-spectrum, or isolate.
  • Batch or date code.

This information helps the consumer to make an educated decision on the quality and efficacy of a CBD product. If this information is absent from the label, it’s best to look for an alternative product.

Is CBD oil legal in Washington? Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents What is CBD? Why is CBD sometimes illegal? Washington CBD laws

Best CBD Oil in Washington State

Washington State’s CBD market is among the fastest growing in the country, with a high concentration in Seattle and the city’s surrounding suburbs. While many CBD-selling shops are cannabis clinics and dispensaries, a number of walk-in head and vape shops sell premium CBD and CBD hemp oil products, as well. Below, we’ve compiled a brief list of all three, with profiles of head and vape shop options for your convenience. If you don’t see an option in your area, remember you can always order CBD products online.

Our favorite CBD product can be purchased online for delivery to Washington State:

Is CBD Legal in Washington?

In 1998, Washington state voters came together to approve the state’s first medical marijuana bill, Initiative Measure No. 692, which allowed for eligible patients or a designated medical provider that qualified under this law’s provisions to possess a 60-day total supply of medical cannabis. Under this original state law, medical marijuana was not allowed to be provided to buyers through dispensaries, but it did allow for up to ten patients to participate together to form a collective marijuana garden. Ever since then, Washington has held a very friendly view on adult use of marijuana. Today, collective gardens are no longer allowed due to the passing of SB 5052, but this same law has allowed the sale of medical marijuana and marijuana-derived CBD products through commercial retailers.

Along with Washington state’s progressive views on medical marijuana, the state has also had a long history of allowing hemp production, manufacturing, and distribution. Because of this, it is a relatively easy and pleasant task to obtain hemp-derived CBD products through many commercial retailers, both large and small. The state’s long history of allowing medical and recreational marijuana and CBD use has helped to foster the growth of open-minded and welcoming marijuana-friendly communities in many of the state’s larger cities, such as Seattle and Spokane over the years.

If you’d rather purchase CBD in person, we’ve put the following guide to help you find the best local shop in Washington State or nearby spots.

CBD Oil Shops in Seattle

There are several clinics and dispensaries selling high-quality CBD products in the Seattle area that are worth checking out. Among them, Uncle Ike’s CD (2310 E Union St, Seattle, WA 98122), Ruckus Recreational (1465 E Republican St, Seattle, WA 98112), Herban Legends (55 Bell St, Seattle, WA 98121), Ganja Goddess (3207 1st Ave S, Seattle, WA 98134), Ganja Goddess (3207 1st Ave S, Seattle, WA 98134), and Have a Heart – Skyway (12833 Martin Luther King Jr Way S, Seattle, WA 98178).

But for those interested in walk-in head and vape shop service, a few places stand out.

The Joint Cooperative (4336 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105) is conveniently located in the University District, offering top-of-the-line CBD oil products at an affordable price. The staff is friendly and helpful, and customers highlight the wall-to-wall selection and excellent store hours. Open seven days a week; Monday-Saturday 10AM-8PM; Sunday 10AM-7PM.

Established in 2013, Anarchy Smoke Shop (17648 1st Ave S, Burien, WA 98148) holds a 4.5-star rating on 30 reviews. Though they specialize in Kratom (and carry the widest selection in all of Washington State), Anarchy also sells a variety of premium CBD oil products at affordable price points. Customer service is a major point of emphasis, and shoppers should feel free to ask the staff for advice, recommendations, and general inquiries about the store’s CBD inventory. Make sure to check online for special deals, too! Open seven days a week; Monday-Saturday 9AM-9PM; Sunday 10AM-7PM.

CBD Oil Shops in Lynwood

Seattle Vapor Co (20101 44th Ave W, Lynnwood, WA 98036) is another 4.5-star-rated shop, offering CBD e-liquids, coils, mods, and over 200 customizable flavors. Established in 2013, customers rave over the shop’s owner and staff, who routinely make the shopping experience enjoyable and educational for novices and enthusiasts alike. CBD oils are available at a number of price points and premium strengths, plus customers can be sure the store’s selection is always the freshest, most up-to-date stock available on the market. Open seven days a week.

CBD Oil Shops in Kirkland and Issaquah

Established in 2009, Xhale Vapor N Smoke has two popular locations in Kirkland (15 Lake St S, Kirkland, WA 98033) and Issaquah (5610 E Lake Sammamish Pkwy SE, Issaquah, WA 98029), with the best selection anywhere east of Seattle: over 150 e-juices, starter and advanced kits, Kratom, and quality CBD and CBD hemp oil products. The staff is friendly, informative, and willing to answer any question you might have about a product. Open seven days a week.

Best CBD Oil in Washington State Washington State’s CBD market is among the fastest growing in the country, with a high concentration in Seattle and the city’s surrounding suburbs. While many